Sunday, August 18, 2013

The Children of Samuel & Elizabeth Mottram

Losing one child would be devastating.  I cannot imagine how crushing it would be to lose four children.

My Great Great Grandparents, Samuel and Elizabeth Mottram, parented ten children, five girls and five boys.  

In birth order;
1.   Mary Mottram  1876 - 1958 (my great grandmother)
2.   Jack Mottram 1877 -1955
3.   Margaret Mottram 1879 - 1882
4.   Elizabeth Mottram 1880 -1884
5.   Sam Mottram 1883 - 1918
6.   Madeline Mottram 1884 - 1972
7.   Fred Mottram 1887 - 1964
8.   Harry Mottram 1889 - 1917
9.   Eve Mottram 1891 - 1981
10. David Mottram 1894 - 1986

Charlie Farr, Maryborough,
circa 1904
Back:  Mary, Samuel, Sam, Jack, Fred
Front: Eve, David, Harry, Elizabeth, Madeline

In 1904, Charlie Farr took photos of the pioneers of the Maryborough area.
Maybe he was paid handsomely for his pioneer photos as he reportedly sold the business later in 1904 ????


The first to die was Margaret, who died in 1882 of Diptheria when she was 3 years old.  Her death was followed two years later by Elizabeth who also died from Diptheria when she was 3 years old.

Henry (known as Harry) was 28 years old when he died from wounds sustained at Polygon Woods, Belgium, during World War 1.  Within 6 months, his brother Samuel, was smothered to death in a mining accident.

Mary Walker, Madeline Batty, Eve Bilton
Mottram sisters
Mary Walker, Madeline Batty, Eve Bilton
Mary is my Great Grandmother.  She was the only one of 
the three sisters to have children.  She was 82 years old when she died of a "Cerebral haemorrhage and senile atherosclerosis"

Madeline was 87 when she died from "Pneumonia & Chronic Renal Failure"

Eve was 89 when she died from a stroke, after suffering from senile dementia for many years. 

Unknown, Eve and Madeline Mottram




















The hats in this weeks Sepia Saturday prompt reminded me of those worn by my
Great Grand Aunts  in the final photo, prompting this post. The unknown lady on the left in my photo also
looks similar to the lady on the right in the Sepia Saturday prompt photo.
Click for more Sepia Saturday Posts

33 comments:

  1. Did you cop a load of the hats the lady's were wearing in the last photo. Some serious research went into that bit of family history.

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    1. I can't imagine wearing them.

      I have plenty more research. This is a summary only :)

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  2. Even though life expectancy wan't so grreat then, and infant mortality was high, it must still have brought a terrible sadness. My great-grandmother lost three sons in WW1 - two in the same year. The little brother who survived had a lot of attention lavished on him by his six sisters.

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    1. I think I remember reading one of your posts about this. How very terrible and sad losing three sons.

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  3. The sisters lived long lives. I love the photo of the three of them. They look very much alike.

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    1. Yes I come from "Strong Foundations" with many family members living long lives.

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  4. The hats are magnificent. Madeline is immediately recognisable through the photos, even before reading the captions.

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    Replies
    1. Yes they are wonderful hats.

      I have always admired Madelines Wedding photo (refer link)

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  5. Very sad story accompanied by wonderful photos!

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    1. The links to Harry and Sam's deaths also tell sad stories.

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  6. My ancestors experienced similar early deaths and also had large families. I sometimes wonder if they had so many children because the odds were such they would lose so many. A sad way of looking at it though--but perhaps practical. Very nice photos in collection. Love the hats!

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    Replies
    1. The same thought had entered my mind but I think it was just a lack of contraception that resulted in so many children!

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  7. A timely reminder of the toll taken by childhood disease a century or more ago. There must have been plenty of family picnics back in those days with empty places due to the scourge of diphtheria and the like.

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    1. Another branch of the family suffered dreadfully from Typhoid. Another disease that killed many.

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  8. Amazing hats they must have stood out when they went out wearing them!
    Jackie
    Scrapbangwallop

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    1. They must have had sore necks by the end of the day!

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  9. How wonderful to have that such lovely family photographs. Early deaths are so sad and were unfortunately so commonplace at that time, when you read monumental inscriptions. I also read that the average age at death in 1900 was just 50 years old in the UK, largely because of the high incidence of infant mortality.

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    1. I have completed a study on the life expectancy of my direct line ancestors, which was very interesting and not what I expected.

      http://shazlex.blogspot.com.au/2012/07/l-is-for-life-expectancy.html

      The accidents certainly reduced the life expectancy but I had one ancestor who died at 92 in the mid 1800s! And according to letters, he had only been bed ridden for 2 weeks.

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  10. Three great photos. Old family photos are so important in our family history, as they show relationships, types of clothing, styles, furnishings in some cases. You are fortunate. Now the threesome of the sisters is lovely, and the hats --- just WOW --- I especially like Eve's. Good choices for this theme.

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    1. I would like to know more about Eve. She always looks happy to me and a little cheeky.

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  11. I agree, how sad to lose children and young men to war...they lived through a very difficult time.

    I did, however, really enjoy the hats!!!

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    1. I wonder where they were going. The races? Or Church? The dresses don't look very fancy though?

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  12. Sad story but quite a familiar one of the times I think - war and disease took so many lives.
    And I agree, the lady on the left of your photo certainly does look like the lady on the right of the prompt photo - well picked.

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    1. Unfortunately too familiar. My Great Great Grandfather took in 2 nieces and a nephew after the death of two of their siblings and mother.

      http://shazlex.blogspot.com.au/2013/04/victims-of-war.html

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  13. Photographs had a very special value when disease and accidents were so common. The hats are fabulous.

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    1. I love photos. They can tell us so much :)

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  14. Wow -- those hats are HUGE. Wonder how they stored them.

    I love the family portrait. They seem well-to-do judging by their beautiful clothes and pocket watches.

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    1. Samuel was a miner and farmer so no they were not wealthy. Unless he had just found some gold???? No, I think that they probably all dressed up for the occasion as Charlie Farr was photographing all the pioneers of the area.

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  15. Those hats are really somethin'! They could almost be used as end tables. I don't think I've ever seen hats that large all together.

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    1. lol.

      I would love to know what the occasion was.

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  16. It must have been sad to lose 4 children. I love the hats in the last shot.

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    1. They are fantastic hats. I wonder what colours they were.

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  17. Wonderful photos. The lost of 4 children must have been hard to bear. My mother lost her daughter before she was 5, long before I was born.

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